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Showing posts from November, 2012

Who Retards Political Change in Ethiopia?

Chairman of Unity for Democracy and Justice (UDJ) party, Dr Negasso Gidada, nicely highlighted the current political condition in Ethiopia. In a discussion forum arranged for party members, Ethiopia’s former president identified major challenges and problems that strangle contemporary politics. The absence of a united public movement for change, the authoritarian nature of the governing party, the limiting nature of the electoral system, the ineffective culture of mediation and negotiation, and the tendency to expect change from above and abroad are major issues highlighted by Dr Negasso. He stressed that the governing party is not willing to change or relinquish power in its own accord.  His suggestion is that, in order to bring genuine change, the Ethiopian people must nurture their political culture and must create immense pressure on the governing party.

VOA Discussions on the EOTC

In my previous post, I tried to examine how the two EOTC synods are approaching the reconcillation effort. Two scenarios were identified and possible trans-synod cooperation and collaboration mechanisms were suggested. In addition to the several comments I got from EthioMedia, where my piece was also posted, the VOA two-part discussions with archibishops  and religious experts from both synods was seminal. What is interesting is that all the discussants loudly asked members of the two synods to make sacrifices of any sort for the sake of EOTC's unity. The opportunity at hand is too big to be missed! 
Part 1 discussants were Abune Gabriel from Ethiopia, Abune Yosef from America, Dr Walle Engidasew from Texas, and myself from Oslo. Liqekahnat Haileselassie Alemayehu and Abba SereqeBirhan WoldeSamuel from America, Dn Daniel Kibret and Megabi Haddis Eshetu Alemayehu from Ethiopia were Part 2 participants. Your comments are most welcome!
Part 1: http://www.voanews.com/mp3/voa/africa/a…

The EOTC at a Crossroads

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During the last two millennia, the Ethiopian Orthodox Tewahido Church (EOTC) survived countless challenges that tremored its integrity and identity. The most serious and most embarrassing of all the challenges is the split of the Holy Synod into two competing factions twenty years ago. The division challenges the very integrity of the church and is in direct contradiction with what the Gospel, its canons, and traditions say.